Tag Archives: canals

Things I Learned While in Amsterdam!

6 Oct

At the end of last month, I returned to the Netherlands after 3 years! It was a quick weekend trip to Amsterdam, filled with two missed trains, free lodging (thanks to a friend!), and tons of laughs!

After being in Amsterdam twice now, I can say pretty comfortably what the most important thing to do for tourists is to do. That is taking a canal tour! Amsterdam loves their canal, and rightfully so because they are historical and absolutely beautiful! There are also lots of options. For us, we wanted a great experience for a reasonable price. Though there were other cheaper options, we ended up taking the Eco Tours Canal Tours which was 18 euros for 75 minutes. It was an open top boat that only took about 12-15 people max. Lucky for us, there  were only 9 people on ours, including our captain/tour guide. It was a very personalized tour, and our captain was obviously very knowledgeable about the history of the city and the canals. Along with some of my favorite pictures, I wanted to give everyone some of the tidbits of information that he bestowed on us. Enjoy!

FUN FACTS OF THE AMSTERDAM AND THE CANALS!

  • Approximately 15,000-16,000 bikes are pulled out of the canals every year by the city of Amsterdam.
  • The houseboats on the canals are at least temporarily attached to the seawalls. They are required to be moved for cleaning and maintenance every few years.
  • You can no longer buy a new slot on the canals for a houseboat. If you want to live in a houseboat, you have to purchase one that is already there. Though the price is extremely expensive, it includes the price of the boat and the slot itself.
  • Back at the beginning of the city, streets did not have street numbers on them. Instead, each of the houses had a name and symbol. A good amount of those symbols are still on the houses today (in my pictures, there is a house that was the “Red Lion”).
  • A good number of the houses around the canals are leaning. Some are leaning because the ground under them have shifted through time. Others were built intentionally leaning to make getting shipments in and out of the buildings easier.
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